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Qualified Service Providers

Frequently Asked Questions

Q:  How much do I get paid as an independent Qualified Service Provider?
A: 
The amount of money you can earn depends on the type of care services you provide to clients and the number of clients you work with.  If you are an independent Qualified Service Provider and provide common care services like light housekeeping, laundry, cooking meals, shopping, bathing, dressing, feeding, and toileting – you can earn up to $20.36 per hour. 

 

Q:  What are the benefits of working for an agency as a Qualified Service Provider?
A:  Depending on the agency, you may have employee benefits such as paid time off and health insurance along with automatic payroll withholding from social security, and federal and state income taxes.  You may also have access to training and support and guidance from colleagues.

 

Q:  How long does it take to enroll as a Qualified Service Provider?
A:  Once all the enrollment paperwork is completed and sent to North Dakota Department of Human Services, approval usually takes about two weeks.

 

Q:  How do I get clients and is there a need for care services in my area?
A:  If you choose, you can add your name to an online database that people use to select their Qualified Service Providers from.  You can also advertise to people looking for in-home help. Contact your local county social service office for information about the type of care services needed in your area.

 

Q:  Is there a cost to become a Qualified Service Provider?
A
:  No.  However, you can choose to participate in optional training to assure you have the necessary skills to provide care.  There is a $10 charge for this training.

 

Q:  What if I want to work with clients that do not qualify for services through the N.D. Department of Human Services?
A:
  You are free to work with anyone you choose – meaning people who will pay you directly and people whose care services are paid for by the North Dakota Department of Human Services. If you only plan to provide care services to clients who will pay you directly – there is no need to sign up to be a Qualified Service Provider.  

 

Q:  My grandmother wants me to be her care provider.  Could I get paid to provide care for her?
A:  Yes.  If your grandma qualifies for in-home care services such as help with bathing, dressing, and housework – she is free to choose anyone to provide care to her including a family member.  People interested in-home help should contact a county social service office to apply for care services.

 

Q:  Becoming a Qualified Service Provider sounds like a great way for me to help care for my grandmother.  I would also like to help her plan for other future needs that she may have as she ages.  Where could we go to get some help?
A:  The North Dakota Department of Human Services offers a service called options counseling.  A trained professional, called an options counselor, works one-on-one with people and their family members to identify goals and preferences, review available care options, and encourage planning for future long-term support needs. The service is free and confidential. To contact an options counselor, call the Aging and Disability Resource LINK toll-free at 1-855-GO2-LINK (1-855-462-5465), ND Relay TTY 1-800-366-6888, or e-mail carechoice@nd.gov.

 

Q:  I want to start an agency that provides in-home care to elderly and physically disabled people.  How do I do that?
A:  There are resources available that can help guide you in starting your own business.  You may want to check various online resources such as the Small Business Administration, the ND Secretary of State’s office, and the Internal Revenue Service. Once your business is established, you can enroll as an Agency Qualified Service Provider.

 

Q:  What else do I need to know before enrolling as a Qualified Service Provider?
A: 
The North Dakota Department of Human Services is required to perform certain safety checks on people who enroll as a Qualified Service Providers.  This includes checking a person’s criminal court history, the national sex offender registry, and the North Dakota Child Abuse and Neglect Registry. The North Dakota Department of Human Services also checks to see if a person has been federally excluded from working with Medicaid or Medicare programs. If problems are found, it may prevent a person from becoming a Qualified Service Provider.